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  • “Teaching my children about adaptation is hard - none of us really know what will happen in the next 10, 20, 30 years,” explains our friend Lulu who works for Tuvalu’s Department of the Environment and is tasked with developing plans for action and adaptation on the tiny island nation. “But I hope that if they choose to stay in this land, that will be a choice they can make themselves - that they will not become climate refugees.” Lulu’s ancestors have lived on the archipelago that makes up this tiny South Pacific nation for some 3000 years. ⁣
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Coconuts and freshly caught fish abound, but the traditional way of life is shifting on the island - and at an accelerated pace. The average elevation in Tuvalu is a mere two meters above sea level, and even by conservative climate model projections, Lulu's children and grandchildren will face serious struggles if they are to remain on their ancestral land and adapt to rising sea levels. In the last couple decades the idea of “climate refugees” has begun to infiltrate the vocabulary of low lying island nations like Tuvalu, raising questions for many elders in the community as to what the future will hold for their children.⁣
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I have posted these words before, and this image as well. I am sharing again today in the hopes of amplifying the voices of Elsie (pictured here), her father Lulu (quoted) and other @pacificclimatewarriors and youth around the world who are stepping up to advocate on behalf of our shared future and planet. ⁣
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If you (like me) are in a privileged enough position today to be using social media, hypothesizing on climate change in it’s more abstract forms, striking, marching, etc, please also give some thought and attention to the plight of the people of Tuvalu and other less economically, structurally or geographically insulated communities who have been and will continue to be on the front lines of the climate crisis. ⁣
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#Tuvalu #ClimateStrike #PacificPawa #PacificClimateWarriors #fridaysforfuture #climateaction
  • “We are not drowning, we are fighting”⁣
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Today is already tomorrow in the Pacific Islands, and the @pacificclimatewarriors are once again on the front lines of the climate movement. A day and a decade ahead, the youth of the Pacific have grown up with the looming threat of climate change - not as an abstract construct, but as a daily reality, literally shifting the ground beneath them and their homes⁣
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These images are from the island of Tuvalu which, according to the UN, is likely to be the first country to lose sovereignty as a result of climate change.⁣
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give an ear, an eye, a shoulder, a heart, some marching - whatever you can - to the Pacific Climate Warriors and youth around the globe today, tomorrow and beyond as they fight call for a strike against a system that is letting all of us down #climatestrike #globalclimatestrike
  • Garrett, Eugénie, Laura. Skagit summer. August 2019 ⁣
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I’ve been shooting film for twenty five years now I guess. but it’s been about a decade since I dusted off the old 4x5 and slowed down enough to slip under the dark cloth. to try to see something. Mostly I didn’t think about it, but sometimes I did and when I did, deep down I feared I might have forgotten, or worse, never knew how to see in that old way, how to reflect, and on good days absorb, the subtle rhythms and stories of an upside down world. a world that demands little, promises nothing, occasionally rewarding patience and precision. Anyway, I made these frames a few weeks ago. They are of people who I respect and enjoy, a friend with a chainsaw (which is the kind of friend I like to hang out with in my spare time), a lovely lady, and a sunset that was pretty. They are simple frames. But I guess you saw that. Other things you didn’t see: I took twenty minutes to make a photo of a cat. I fumbled with dark slides and sweated over loading sheet film, messed up stuff. I’m not saying this is a good way to spend your time. In the end, the bits of light that worked their way through the bellows and across the emulsion of those single solitary frames mattered for no one much, except me. And in that realization, in those few moments, I was reminded of why I fell in love with this stuff ⁣
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Excited to be heading out this week into the Colorado high country on my first fully analog personal project in quite some time. Appreciate all the friends (starting with my father - and right up to present day ) who have encouraged, taught, and further instigated this mad love affair over the years #graflex #speedgraphic #4x5 #kodak @kodak @kodak_shootfilm
  • Arktika • fortunate to call this ship our home (on keels?) in the ‘bergs last month. a remarkable ship made more remarkable by an intrepid captain and crew who have used her to explore the quickly changing glaciated coastlines and largely uncharted waters of east Greenland. In contrast to the more developed western coast of Greenland, the east coast is sparsely inhabited, with the majority of three thousand residents spread between a handful of fishing communities. With no roads and little development, the majority of information about this coastline comes from local folklores, outdated government charts, exploratory forays by extractive industries and the occasional curious sailing crew. Looking forward to see what this crew gets up to in coming years, working to educate and advocate for this truly wild landscape in the face of the melting icecap and the already heightening international push (as new waterways for navigation open around the icecap) for extraction.
  • Imagination still rolling and reeling from the vast and humbling scale and swells of Greenland’s Eastern Coast.⁣⁣
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A deep thanks to the crew of the @auroraarktika @haukursigurdsson for sharing the knowledge gained from years spent charting the largely unmapped waterways of this shifting landscape, and to the fellow berg admirers and puppynappers @leilani.rose.b @ktstj  @sturgegram @chriswhitephoto @laura.yale @eddiebauer
  • Returning from Greenland only to find we missed out on international dog day. Fortunately we were able to hang out with our friend Dinas and his puppies, who will someday perhaps participate in international dog day on the internet themselves - or at least some east Greenlandic dog sled racing and polar bear hunts⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣
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We spent only an evening with Dinas and his family/pack, but it was a privilege and quite the eye opening experience to get to share a meal and stories of racing and hunting with his dogs, learning from his father and grandfather, and some of his community’s experiences navigating what he calls East Greenland’s shift from “Stone Age to iPhone Age” over the past three decades. Stories told matter of factly of experiences in the natural world that defy what we understand in cultures further removed from the land, “things that may sound strange to you, but for us they are normal”
  • cascade waves
  • “Aniakchak: a wild love story” - new film online this weekend for your viewing pleasures⁣
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A tale from a time when our knees were full of cartilage, our hearts full of curiosity, and our heads were full of...well, who knows what our heads were full of. Silly ideas apparently⁣
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Over the course of our traverse of the Alaska Peninsula and the making of this film we collectively (along with the help of seventeen types of rain) broke five cameras, popped a boat, ran out of pudding, got mildly lost in the least visited monument in the US park system, capsized a boat, got stalked by a skinny griz, saw a sea eagle, smoked one cigarette, still were out of pudding, started a book club, broke multiple tents, took turns using limbs as tent poles, did not starve to death, and did not ruin our friendships, graham and Shannon’s marriage, or each other’s lives entirely⁣
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 Big thanks to dear pals Shannon and Graham for trusting us with their story and letting us go off road thirdwheeling with them in such a spectacular setting @shanmcd8 @grahamzimmerman⁣
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High fives to Tommy for nabbing the 100lb pack award and running safety boat while also doing camera wizardry, to Jim for the initial concept, direction and holding the vision in the edit, Laura for going above and beyond with the illustrations, and Luc for the beta  @tommypenick @bedrockfilmworks @jimaikman @laurakottlowski @lucmehl⁣
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Also worth noting our time on wild and scenic rivers is made possible in large part by the hard work of organizations like @americanrivers @americanwhitewater⁣
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And a hearty thank you to @rei and @nrsweb for making this film possible - with additional support from @kokopellipackraft @outdoorresearch @goalzero @expedusa @trailbutter @msr_gear @wernerpaddles
  • just passing through
  • late birds on the hunt for high country worms [CT scouting w/Joe]
  • [process] letting the legs work and the mind rest. and pizza. pizza is so nice.
  • [Journal Excerpt 6.12.19] From ages thirteen to sixteen I lived in a window gable turned bedroom in a remote valley in Washington state. I fell asleep most nights with my toes against an antique gun case and my head tucked under the fly tying desk of the fisherman who owned the house, Babbitt (Babe) Miles. I didn’t care about the guns, but I dug the fly tying desk with its dozens of drawers stuffed with brightly colored feathers and threads. ⁣⁣
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I learned to tie flys in the winter and would fish the little stream by the one room school during recess in the spring. I lived for the summers though. In the summers, after work at the bakery, we would row the wooden dory (The Little Dipper) around the lagoon at the head of the lake. up into the mouth of the river. One time I caught a bat. Sometimes we caught nothing. It didn’t matter. it was summer and the living really was easy. every once in awhile, it all came together. The winter of tying flies, practicing casts on the ballfield, the quiet slip of the oars and the steady push of the boat upstream followed by the drift. ⁣⁣
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On those evenings time ceased to matter, our homemade flys eventually unraveling from the bombardment of voracious and undiscerning cutthroat and rainbows, our excited yells shattering the quiet of the valley dusk.⁣⁣
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Nothing ever really changed in those years just before it all disappeared. Not in the way you thought it might, not in the way it would have mattered. As much as we might have rowed, we were always headed for the end of the lake, that place where the water grew still, the world became busy.⁣⁣
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I don’t fish much anymore. But once in awhile when the oars are shipped, and the boat drifts again into the quiet of the river, I go back there. Once in awhile I wonder if we ever left. ⁣⁣
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The drift ends and once more we row upstream, against the current, hoping for silver in the gloaming, a memory on the end of an invisible line.